2017 Ballot Measure Summaries and League of Women Voters Pro-Con Statements

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There are six Greeley questions on the November 2017 ballot. Below are ballot measure summaries as well as statements in favor of and opposed to these measures.

Ballot Measure 2K

Additional Keep Greeley Moving Revenue: As part of the “Keep Greeley Moving” sales tax for roads approved by voters in 2015, the City was required by state law to estimate the tax revenue that would be generated. The local economy has been strong and has generated more tax revenue than originally estimated. This 2017 ballot measure is a request to allow the City to reinvest those additional revenues back into Greeley’s roads. The measure brings the total available for use to the full .65% and requires all of it to be used for roads. The Keep Greeley Moving ballot measure was approved by voters in 2015 and expires in 2022.

Some in favor say:

  • Greeley has roads that have not been repaired yet, and this will help with those repairs.
  • Voters approved a .65% sales tax for roads in 2015 and this follows voters’ wishes by allowing the full amount to be used on roads.
  • Growth requires more streets and street maintenance. Greeley’s population is growing and this will help offset costs associated with growth.
  • These restrictions apply: the tax does not apply to groceries, voters can end this tax in its entirety in 2022, and funds collected must be used for road repairs and capacity improvements.
  • The City has done a good job so far repairing roads using the revenue from the .65% sales tax.

Some opposed say:

  • The Colorado constitution allows funds to be refunded or credits given when this situation occurs.
  • Greeley taxpayers can put the refund or credits to good use for something other than government spending on roads.
  • The City could make additional road repairs if reductions or adjustments are made to other City services.
  • Over the seven years of the .65% sales tax for roads, Greeley will still be able to spend approximately $66.4 million on roads.
  • This is not the time to keep more taxpayer dollars.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

Ballot Measure 2L

Municipal Option for Senate Bill 152:Prior to 2005, home rule cities in Colorado were allowed to provide broadband service. After the Colorado state legislature passed Senate Bill 152, a city could only provide broadband service if the voters at a municipal election authorized the city to do so. This ballot question asks voters to reinstate local authority over the community’s ability to discuss broadband delivery options.

Some in favor say:

  • Current broadband providers do not have to offer competitive pricing for service.
  • Voters in sixty-eight other Colorado cities have already approved identical measures for their communities.
  • There is no financial commitment on the part of city government, residents or businesses with this measure.
  • This opens the door to possible public-private partnership discussions.

Some opposed say:

  • Government should not be in the broadband or internet business.
  • The City should try asking for better service for businesses and residents from existing providers.
  • More government interference in the private sector is not useful.
  • On its own, technological advancements will encourage competition.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

Ballot Measure 2M

Greeley’s Form of Government: This is a proposed change to Greeley’s Home Rule Charter to clarify that the City operates under the Council-Manager form of government, in that power is vested in the elective members of the Greeley City Council, and the Council appoints a City Manager to manage the administrative functions of the City.

Some in favor say:

  • Without this change, the City charter language is incomplete – this housekeeping change clarifies Greeley’s Council-Manager form of government.

Some opposed say:

  • The Charter is working fine without the language. This just adds unnecessary items to the ballot.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

Ballot Measure 2N

Municipal Judge’s Requirements: This is a proposed change to Greeley’s Home Rule Charter to make the distinction that the requirements to live in Greeley, the 4-year term of office, and the terms of removal of office apply to the Presiding Judge only and not the associate judges.

Some in favor say:

  • Greeley is a small city, thus finding qualified associate judges is difficult. Removing the residency requirement allows for a larger pool of qualified potential appointees.

Some opposed say:

  • It is best to have municipal judges who all reside in and have a connection to the community.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

Ballot Measure 2O

Revocable Permits: This is a proposed change to Greeley’s Home Rule Charter to remove this section so that the authority to approve revocable permits, which are permissions to encroach into the public rights-of-way with items such as fences, signs or awnings, would rest with City staff rather than City Council.

Some in favor say:

  • The City needs to improve its customer service including turn-around time on resident and business requests. This is one way to help accomplish that goal by assigning the responsibility to City staff.

Some opposed say:

  • The City Council represents residents and businesses in Greeley and should maintain control over these permit requests.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

Ballot Measure 2P

Terms for the Planning Commission: This is a proposed change to Greeley’s Home Rule Charter to reduce the terms of appointment from 5 years to 3 years to be consistent with most other boards and commissions appointed by City Council.

Some in favor say:

  • Shortening the length of terms for commission volunteers offers opportunities for more residents to serve over time and potentially creates opportunities for new ideas and perspectives.

Some opposed say:

  • The Planning Commission is working fine and consistency is good on a board that makes frequent recommendations to City staff and the City Council.

This information is provided for Greeley voters so that they can decide these questions for themselves.

The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

League of Women Voters (LWV) Greeley-Weld County, Inc. has reviewed and given guidance to the City in preparation for this publication. The LWV is not responsible for the accuracy or fairness of the arguments of either side.

League of Women Voters Weld CountyLEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
OF GREELEY-WELD COUNTY, INC.

Lwvgreeleyweldcounty.org

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